Please click here for our latest coronavirus (COVID-19) response and preparedness.

How to Stop Craving Drugs

A person in a hoodie is on the ground reaching out to the drugs

Drug cravings follow substance abuse and addiction. A person will build a tolerance to a specific drug and experience temporary withdrawal symptoms when not intoxicated. If a person is looking to learn how to stop craving drugs, then admitting to an addiction is the first step. There are numerous ways to reduce cravings or avoid continuing drug abuse or relapsing. 

Symptoms of Drug Addiction

Addiction is a chronic mental disease that inflicts relapsing and compulsive drug seeking and uses, regardless of the adverse repercussions. Cravings are connected to addiction and are considered an average effect of improper drug use. Before a person deals with severe cravings, drug addiction signs are displayed. Some physical signs of drug use can be weight loss, pinpoint pupils, clenching of the jaw, irregular breathing or sleeping patterns, or a frequent runny nose. 

 

Other drug addiction symptoms include:

 

  • Self-isolation 
  • Poor hygiene 
  • Poor work ethic 
  • Secretive behavior 
  • Sudden financial issues 
  • No desire to socially interact
  • Behavioral or personality changes 
  • Lack of interest in personal interests or achieving goals 

 

Addiction cravings can begin soon after the first few uses of a drug. Addiction can cause physical cravings and manipulate proper functioning in the brain. If you or a loved one is struggling with addiction, a successful, easy detox treatment center is often necessary to attend to produce long-term recovery. 

 

How Long Does a Craving Last?

Drug cravings tend to start during the in-between period or when a person needs to purchase more drugs. During temporary withdrawal, drug cravings become heightened. A prevention plan is advised after treatment since cravings can resurface weeks, months, or even years after maintaining sobriety. Depending on the person, these feelings can last minutes or hours but learning how to stop craving drugs can help reduce the thoughts quickly. 

Ways to Stop Cravings for Drugs 

To avoid giving in to cravings, understand your triggers. Keeping a journal may help since a person can write down when they are feeling the urge to relapse and what a situation looks like that causes the thought and feeling. Preventing emotional or social triggers can help prevent relieving toxic patterns. 

 

Here are more ways to know how to stop craving drugs: 

 

  • Reward yourself 
  • Try new exercises 
  • Change environments
  • Build a support system 
  • Communicate your feelings 
  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy 
  • Meditate and practice mindfulness 
  • Enjoy healthy distractions like singing or music 

 

Living a healthy lifestyle and focusing on your body, mind, and soul are wonderful ways to avoid relapsing. Cravings can seem severe and impossible, but giving time, breathing, and positively distracting the mind can help people through intense cravings. Drug detox and individualized treatment plans can help a person safely recover and find therapeutic methods that help them throughout life. 

Addiction Treatment at Our Florida Wellness Center 

Intensive inpatient rehab can dramatically help addicts struggling to recover from addiction. Our experienced medical staff provides a clean and safe environment during the withdrawal process. Our special programs like our family groups grant the opportunity for addicts and their families to mend relationships. Plus, our sober support groups are a wonderful way to express feelings about addiction cravings. 

 

Please contact a specialist at Evoke Wellness today by calling 833-819-6066. Ask about our alumni program for after treatment! 

 

Related Readings: 

Benzo Addictions, When Do They Start?

How to Help Someone with Addiction

Ready to Make a Change?

We understand that the treatment process can be difficult at times. At Evoke Wellness Florida, we are committed to assisting you in making progress towards a new life free from the grips of addiction.

For Confidential Help, Call: