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The Danger of Mixing Methadone and Xanax

Xanax and methadone are defined as sedatives, but Xanax treats anxiety and panic disorders while methadone reduces severe pain or withdrawal symptoms. Both drugs work within the central nervous system (CNS) and disrupt proper brain functioning.

 

What schedule drug is Xanax? The drug is classified as Schedule IV, a controlled substance. However, Xanax is well-known to be highly addictive and causes physical dependence. If both drugs are mixed, then side effects are heightened and worsen after each use. 

What Are the Side Effects of Methadone? 

Methadone is a synthetic analgesic opioid that produces similar effects to morphine and oxycodone. Opioid detox treatment typically will use methadone as a substitute drug to reduce withdrawal symptoms. The chemicals in the drug attach to opioid receptors in the brain and block the effects that cause addiction, such as the “high” sensations.

 

It’s vital to be aware side effects of the substance before use: 

 

  • Itchiness
  • Headache
  • Irritability
  • Dry mouth
  • Weight gain
  • Constipation
  • Mood swings
  • Blurred vision
  • Excessive sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting 
  • Decreased sexual drive 

 

Methadone should only be taken as prescribed. If a person builds a tolerance and methadone abuse becomes a problem, then a methadone detox is advised. Speak to a professional about any underlying conditions or previous addictions before taking the medication. 

What Are the Long-Term Side Effects of Xanax?

Xanax is a benzodiazepine or benzo, with alprazolam being its main ingredient. Xanax is similar to methadone since it’s a CNS depressant, but it can also act as a sedative. Although many people will rely on the drug to treat anxiety disorders, substance abuse is a possible result. The drug has a short half-life, and people tend to take frequent doses, quickly building tolerance. 

 

Xanax’s long-term side effects include:

 

  • Memory loss 
  • Vision deterioration 
  • Difficulty problem solving
  • Problem learning new verbal skills 
  • Slower response time or cognitive decline
  • Inability to easily concentrate or pay attention to detail 

 

More common side effects include stomach pains, muscle weakness, fatigue, headaches, and constipation. Methadone and Xanax share similar common side effects. A user should highly consider a Xanax detox if adverse side effects occur or withdrawal symptoms begin soon after last use. 

Can You Take Methadone and Xanax Together?

The short answer to the question is no. Taking methadone and Xanax together is extremely dangerous since both are central nervous system depressants, increasing the chance of overdose. Mixing methadone and Xanax can worsen overall symptoms and increase the intensity of withdrawal symptoms. The effects of taking Xanax and methadone together include respiratory depression, coma, or overdose. Users should seek immediate medical attention if signs of addiction occur or if a person experiences negative side effects. 

Resources & Recovery at Evoke Wellness 

At our Florida Wellness Center, our easy detox rehab provides patients with the resources and services they need to begin the treatment and recovery process. Our team of experts provides a clean environment, welcoming those from all walks of life to receive the treatment they deserve to get back on track. We offer sober support groups, an alumni program, and more. Don’t wait to get started! 

 

Speak to a professional at Evoke Wellness by calling 833-819-6066 and asking about our dual diagnosis program and residential treatment to get started today! 

 

Related Readings: 

What Are Opioid Eyes

Effects of Mixing Xanax and Alcohol

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